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From a post by u/_me_hoy_minoy_ on Reddit

In an earlier incarnation, Kanye West’s most recent album was called Yandhi and billed as the sequel to Yeezus. This was not to be. “Everybody wanted Yandhi, but Jesus Christ did the laundry,” Kanye explains early in the album we did end up getting, Jesus is King. The changeup left many fans (understandably) blindsided. But as enticing as the idea of a Yeezus sequel was, we should have known better than to take Kanye at his word. Since Yeezus, his harsh and confrontational left turn away from the revered My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy (“Soon as they like you, make ’em unlike you”), each new album rollout has been more chaotic and unpredictable than the last. Look at the leadup to 2017’s The Life of Pablo: three scrapped titles (I’m still holding out hope for Turbo Grafx 16) and at least as many variations of the track list, all scribbled in Sharpie on a piece of looseleaf and blasted out on Twitter. …


In their review of Rough and Rowdy Ways, Bob Dylan’s first original album in 8 years, Pitchfork alludes to the once-in-a-blue-moon interview that Dylan gave the New York Times shortly before its release: “Dylan is asked whether the coronavirus could be seen as a Biblical reckoning — a difficult question to imagine posing to any other living musician. We have learned to come to Dylan with these types of quandaries, and more often than not, we have left satisfied.”

Bob Dylan might as well be two thousand years old. Even in his mid-60s heyday, rather than riding the wave of psychedelia or discussing social issues explicitly (a tack which he’d pointedly abandoned after The Times They Are A’Changin’, with few exceptions), he was saying things like “Einstein disguised as Robin Hood, with his memories in a trunk, passed this way an hour ago with his friend, a jealous monk”, “Mona Lisa must have had the highway blues, you can tell by the way she smiled”, “I was riding on the Mayflower when I thought I spied some land.” It should be noted that Dylan, ever the man of mystery, has operated under many lyrical guises throughout his career (see: the searing heartbreak of Blood On the Tracks and Time Out of Mind, New Morning’s touching fragments of domestic bliss, the infamous trio of born-again Christian albums in the early 80s). But it’s worth considering the colorfully peopled, historically anachronistic mythmaking showcased in songs like “Desolation Row”, “Visions of Johanna”, and “Bob Dylan’s 115th Dream”, among others, as a lyrical mode in itself — a mode in which Mona Lisa is a world-weary traveler, Einstein a cunning outlaw, and Dylan himself an explorer who discovered America. …


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Growing up in the suburbs has given me plenty of opportunities to drive around. When staying at home starts to wear thin, and I realize there are only a few crumpled singles in my wallet that seemed much fatter yesterday, I’ll hop in the car, usually with a friend or two, and cruise along without any particular destination.

I don’t do it for the novelty. On the contrary, some days I feel like I could weave my way through every tiny cross street in my town blindfolded. And I don’t see it as a way of getting to a destination. …


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All I want is for you to be happy. All you want is for me to be happy. The only way for you to be happy is to make me feel happy, and the only way for me to be happy is to make you feel happy. It seems that my happiness and your happiness both hinge on being the instrument of each other’s happiness.

So, I pour myself into making you feel happy, and you do the same for me. The harder I work at the job, the less work you have to do, since the process of working toward your happiness increases my own happiness — which is, of course, your objective. …


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Pretzel Love at its finest

Before Twitter came along, corporate advertising and the everyday language of young people rarely mixed. Now, thanks to the social networking giant, that Venn diagram is a near-perfect circle. Indeed, countless brands have taken to Twitter for marketing purposes, hoping to engage a vast millennial audience as directly as possible. The most effective of them don’t broadcast, pander, or even advertise — they converse. Ironically, talking to consumers is a great way for a company to show, and not tell, that it really cares.

Take JetBlue. The airline bills itself as “a customer service company that happens to fly planes.” Those aren’t just empty words — the company has a 25-person “Customer Commitment Team” who craft personalized responses to tweets. The team’s efforts subvert the expectation that such a large company would have a generic or altogether unresponsive customer service presence. …

About

Casey Burke

Ex-magician, still knows the tricks

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